بوداپست – Budapest

It was the first time that I was going to go to India in order to search for Syriac manuscripts in the jungle of Kerala, and thus I was waiting with understandable excitement for my turn at the visa department of the Indian embassy, a beautiful little villa up in the hills of Buda. In the meantime I was gazing at the poster of a new Bollywood film on the wall. Behind the young lovers in traditional Indian vest there emerged an exotic building, gleaming with a thousand lights and promising a thousand wonders of the fabulous India. It took some time until I realized that this building was the Chain Bridge of Budapest. Later in India I got to know that Bollywood directors liked to shot their musicals in Budapest precisely because it appears so exotic to the Indian public.

Der Betrachter ist im Bild, the viewer is in the picture, was the title of the introduction into reception aesthetics by Wolfgang Kemp in the 80s. And not only in the interpretation of the picture, as Kemp meant it, but also in the pictures made by the viewer. As for example in the pictures of Liu Maoshan every European city is being converted into Song-period Chinese landscapes.

Liu Maoshan
Liu Maoshan
Liu Maoshan
Liu Maoshan
The Persian blog شبزنده ها Shabzendehâ, “Vigils” – in elegant Humanist Latin we could translate it Lucubrationes published on Farvardin 8, 1388, that is on March 28, 2009 this beautiful series of three hundred photos on Budapest (first click on the green “Shabzendeha Pictures” inscription, and then on the “Budapest 09” button in the upper left part). شهر خیلی قشنگی هست, امیدوارم از عکس ها خوشتون بیاد “The city is beautiful, I hope that this is also conveyed by the pictures”, writes Omid H. Hassam, and we have to agree with him. Although he took photos almost exclusively in the city center, nevertheless these pictures are not the well known postcards, not the usual cuttings living in our head, and not even the clearly structured Western tourist photos focusing on the perpetuation of one single object. In these photos the structures become loose, and they are dominated by lights, cross-cuttings and movement. In these pictures Budapest is an Eastern city which has seen better days and is chaotic, but also vivid and hiding a thousand secrets, a little Tehran.

Omid H. Hassam: Budapest (Shabzendeha)
Omid H. Hassam: Budapest (Shabzendeha)
Omid H. Hassam: Budapest (Shabzendeha)
Omid H. Hassam: Budapest (Shabzendeha)
Omid H. Hassam: Budapest (Shabzendeha)
Omid H. Hassam: Budapest (Shabzendeha)
Omid H. Hassam: Budapest (Shabzendeha)
Omid H. Hassam: Budapest (Shabzendeha)
Omid H. Hassam: Budapest (Shabzendeha)
Shajarian, Saz-e khamush, Néma lant, lemezborító

The prisoner's romance


Que por mayo era por mayo,
cuando hace la calor,
cuando los trigos encañan
y están los campos en flor;
cuando canta la calandria
y responde el ruiseñor;
cuando los enamorados
van a servir al amor;
sino yo, triste, cuitado,
que vivo en esta prisión,
que ni sé cuándo es de día,
ni cuándo las noches son,
sino por una avecilla
que me cantaba al albor.
Matómela un ballestero;
dele Dios mal galardón.
In May it was, in May,
when the days are hot,
when the wheat ripens
and the fields are in flower;
when the lark sings
and the nightingale replies,
when lovers
serve the god of Love.
Except for me, poor wretch,
who live in this prison,
unaware of daybreak
and unaware of nightfall,
save when a little bird
sang to me at dawn –
An archer shot it;
may God grant him small thanks!

This is one of the first romances, if not the very first one, that I had learned as a little boy – writes Wang Wei. It was sung by my mother and I remember her singing it exactly in those days of May described in the poem. With the difference that she added the refrain: “¡Ay, de la pena!” – “Oh, sorrow!” or “Alas!”:

Que por mayo era por mayo,
cuando hace la calor,
[Ay, de la pena, cuando hace la calor]
cuando los trigos encañan
y están los campos en flor;
[Ay, de la pena, y están los campos en flor]
cuando canta la calandria
y responde el ruiseñor;
[Ay, de la pena, y responde el ruiseñor]
...
In May it was, in May,
when the days are hot
– alas, the days are hot! –
when the wheat ripens
and the fields are in flower
– alas, the fields are in flower! –
when the lark sings
and the nightingale replies
– alas, and the nightingale replies! –


It is a short romance, so that the forced repetitions and the slow and reiterative melody endowed it with the feeling of a never ending desperate lament. In the course of time this romance has been more and more appreciated by me and by now it has become one of my favorites. I have recalled it as in these days we spoke about nightingales, and I was happy to see that others who had not known it, now read it with the same curiosity and appreciation. And while consulting the edition of Spanish romances by Paloma Díaz-Mas (Barcelona: Crítica, 1994, 284), I also found there a special appraisal of it:

This is indoubtedly one of the most beautiful and most perfect romances. The lament of an unknown prisoner in first person, the initial description of the blossoming springtime and the lyricism and beauty of the images together make it an exceptionally impressive literary work.

The poem exists in two versions. There is also a longer one which, in a very prosaic way, presents the prisoner almost as a “wild man,” with monstruous look and broken away from society. (This, in my opinion, relates the text to the allegorical world of late 15th-century sentimental novel, converting the prision into a Cárcel de amor.) The prisoner is planning in it how to escape, and finally he is set free in an inexplicable way by the king who suddenly has mercy on him. I never liked this version. On the contrary, the one published here is almost perfect in its concentration and allusiveness.

There was another problem, however, which has made me browsing through a multitude of electronic and printed pages: the music. A first, quick search led me to the versions of Amancio Prada:


and of Chicho Sánchez Ferlosio (what a peculiar figure he was and how much we have forgot him!) who also enlarged the Medieval romance with an allegorical “commentary” of his own:

Cárcel tengo por fuera,
cárcel por dentro.
Voy vagando y vagando,
puerta no encuentro.
Tener cárcel no me importara
cárcel por fuera,
si de la de aquí adentro
salir pudiera.

Veo el campo a lo lejos
por la ventana.
Tristeza, esperanza,
noche y mañana.
Allí crece la hierba
de primavera.
Esperanza y tristeza,
luz y quimera.
Prison outside
and prison inside.
I’m roaming about
and finding no door.
I would not bother with
the prison outside
if I could set free from
the prison inside.

I see the field afar
through the window.
Sorrow and hope
night and tomorrow.
The flower of the spring
is blossoming there.
Hope and sorrow
light and mirage.



Both of them were enthusiastic about this type of poetry, mixing it with their respective manias and claims so characteristic of those seventies and early eighties when one had to regain possession of everything, including traditional poems. And of course their setting to music is very far from that subtlety of the romance how I keep it in my memory. Something similar can be told about the version of Paco Ibáñez, although it is marked by a much more popular tone, more fitting to the spirit of the text (you can listen to it here). And by searching a bit more, one also finds a more erudite and really good version sung by June Telletxero.


Romance del prisionero, interpretation of June Telletxero, accompanied on lute by Zif Bracha.

So far, so good. However, I was unable to find anywhere the version of my childhood – “alas!” Thus, in order to present it, I am constrained to hum it myself, offering a thousand apologies for the audacity, and pledging my word that as soon as someone offers us a more worthy version of it, we will immediately eliminate this one without a trace.


Romance del prisionero, interpretation of Wang Wei.

El romance del prisionero


Que por mayo era por mayo,
cuando hace la calor,
cuando los trigos encañan
y están los campos en flor;
cuando canta la calandria
y responde el ruiseñor;
cuando los enamorados
van a servir al amor;
sino yo, triste, cuitado,
que vivo en esta prisión,
que ni sé cuándo es de día,
ni cuándo las noches son,
sino por una avecilla
que me cantaba al albor.
Matómela un ballestero;
dele Dios mal galardón.

Es uno de los primeros, si no el primer romance que aprendí siendo aún niño. Lo cantaba mi madre, y la recuerdo a ella cantándolo justo en aquellos días de mayo descritos en los versos. Solo que ella introducía el estribillo «¡Ay, de la pena!»:

Que por mayo era por mayo,
cuando hace la calor,
[Ay, de la pena, cuando hace la calor]
cuando los trigos encañan
y están los campos en flor;
[Ay, de la pena, y están los campos en flor]
cuando canta la calandria
y responde el ruiseñor;
[Ay, de la pena, y responde el ruiseñor]


Es un romance breve, así que las repeticiones forzadas, junto a la melodía lenta y reiterativa lo alargaban y le daban un aire de lamento infinito y desesperado. Con el tiempo, este romance ha crecido también en mi aprecio hasta convertirse en uno de mis favoritos. Me vino a la memoria estos días en que hablábamos de ruiseñores y comprobé con alegría que al mencionarlo a quienes no lo habían oído despertaba la misma curiosidad y gusto. Fui a refrescar mis datos a la edición de romances que hizo Paloma Díaz-Mas (Barcelona: Crítica, 1994, 284) y encontré también allí una valoración especial:

Es éste sin duda uno de los más bellos y logrados romances: el parlamento en primera persona en que un desconocido prisionero se lamenta de su situación, la descripción inicial del entorno en que florece la primavera, el lirismo y la belleza de las situaciones se conjugan para hacer un producto literario muy sugerente.

Hay dos versiones, una larga en que de manera bastante prosaica el prisionero se nos presenta casi como un «hombre salvaje», monstruoso y apartado del mundo (cosa que, a mi modo de ver, pone en contacto el texto con el ambiente alegórico de la novela sentimental de finales del s. XV, convirtiendo la prisión en una Cárcel de amor), planea la fuga y acaba siendo liberado de manera inexplicable por el rey, que de pronto se apiada de él. Nunca me gustó esta versión. En cambio, la que hemos transcrito aquí, la breve, es casi perfecta en su concentración y alusividad.

Pero es otro el problema que me ha tenido un buen rato revolviendo páginas (electrónicas y de las otras): la música. Una búsqueda básica muestra rápidamente las versiones de Amancio Prada:


y de Chicho Sánchez Ferlosio (¡qué personaje tan curioso y hoy tan olvidado!):


Ambos se apasionaron por este tipo de poesía, pero mezclándola con sus respectivas manías y reivindicaciones, todo muy encuadrado en aquellos años setenta y principios de los ochenta en que aún había que recuperarlo todo, hasta los versos tradicionales. Y, desde luego, su musicación está muy lejos de la sensibilidad del romance tal como yo lo guardo en la memoria. Con la versión de Paco Ibáñez pasa algo parecido, aunque él le imprime un aire bastante más popular y ajustado al espíritu de la letra (podéis escucharlo aquí). Y si se busca un poco más, se encuentra una versión culta, francamente buena, cantada por June Telletxero.


Romance del prisionero, soprano: June Telletxero, laúd: Zif Bracha.

De acuerdo. Pero por ningún lado he sido capaz de dar con la versión de mi infancia, «ay, de la pena», así que me atrevo a canturrear los primeros versos pidiendo mil veces perdón por la osadía y jurando que en cuanto alguien nos proporcione una versión digna inmediatamente ésta será eliminada sin dejar ni rastro.


Romance del prisionero, interpretación de Wang Wei.

Bernard Plossu: On Sudek

Josef Sudek
Introduction of the catalog of the exhibition Una ventana en Praga (A window on Prague), Madrid 2009.

Few things are needed to make a great photo… And nevertheless it is not easy, for in fact there is a great difficulty behind its apparent simplicity. The ship of Manuel Álvarez Bravo, the water drop on Shoji Ueda’s umbrella, the New England farm house of Paul Strand, the snow-covered crossroad of Izis, the New York subway escalator of Duane Michals, or the cluttered studio of Josef Sudek from 1951.

None of these photos are spectacular, there’s no virtuosity, only a kind of, how should I say, magic evidence! close to the exactitude of Balzac or Mizoguchi, as if it were a product of nature.

All the works of Sudek are like this. He observes himself, his surroundings, his city. He lives through the stations, he breathes while watching. He comprehends the mystery of things and moments.

When a young student asks me “What is photography?”, I reply: “Look at Sudek or at Diane Arbus, there is everything there!” Or nowadays Luis Baylón or Eric Dessert…

One feels tempted to say: Sudek is THE photography! Streets, gardens, windows, objects, wide landscapes, his city, his house. That’s all. It is not about beauty. It is not about modernity.

And not about pleasure, either. I think of Corot’s saying: “It’s not about searching but about waiting.” I also think of Morandi. And the last landscapes of Braque in Varengeville. I do not know the Czech Republic, neither Prague. But with the photos of Sudek I have impressed in my mind the memory of a place where I have never been.

The same thing passes to me with Ueda and Japan. Would it bee too bold to say “it is not worth to go any more”?

Back to photography: to see is an evidence, but the language which translates the vision can be very simple… or full of traps. (For example when the clichés turn into “clichés”, and sorry for the tautology.)

The tramways on a street of Prague: we can hear all the noise surrounding them in this photo of Sudek from 1924. His steamed-up window onto the street expires humidity.

If I already dare to write on a master, I want to say what I think. But I think that every photographer will agree with me: Josef Sudek is THE photography.

And we admire him with mouth wide open, don’t we?

Josef Sudek

Bernard Plossu: Sobre Sudek

Josef Sudek
Introducción del catálogo de la muestra Una ventana en Praga, Madrid 2009.

Hacen falta pocas cosas para hacer una gran fotografía… Y sin embargo, no es fácil, pues, en efecto, hay una gran dificultad tras su aparente simplicidad. La barca de Manuel Álvarez Bravo, la gota de agua en el paraguas de Shoji Ueda, la granja de Nueva Inglaterra de Paul Strand, el cruce de camino bajo la nieve de Izis, la salida del metro de Nueva York de Duane Michals o el desordenado estudio de Josef Sudek en 1951.

Ninguna de estas fotografías es espectacular, no son ninguna proeza, simplemente una especie de, cómo decirlo, ¡evidencia mágica! cercana a la exactitud de los sentimientos en Balzac o en Mizoguchi, como si fuera un hecho natural.

Toda la obra de Sudek es así: se observe a sí mismo, mire a su alrededor o a su ciudad. Vive las estaciones, respira viendo. Ahí está, sintiendo el misterio de las cosas y los momentos.

Cuando un estudiante joven me pregunta: «¿Qué es la fotografía?», respondo: «Ved a Sudek y a Diane Arbus, ¡ahí lo tenéis todo!» O, en la actualidad, a Luis Baylón o a Eric Dessert…

Uno siente la tentación de decir: ¡Sudek es LA fotografía! Calles, jardines, ventanas, objetos, paisajes panorámicos, su ciudad, su casa. Es así. No se trata de belleza. No se trata de ser moderno.

Ni de gustar. Pienso en Corot cuando decía: «No se trata de buscar sino de esperar». Pienso también en Morandi. Y en los últimos paisajes de Braque en Varengeville. No conozco la República Checa, ni tampoco Praga. Pero con las fotografías de Sudek tengo impreso en la mente el recuerdo de un lugar al que nunca he ido.

Lo mismo me pasa con Ueda y Japón. Pienso, ¿sería tan osado como para decir «ya no merece la pena ir»?

Retornemos a la fotografía: ver es una evidencia, pero el lenguaje que lleva a traducir la visión puede ser muy simple… y llenarse de trampas. (Por ejemplo, cuando los clichés se vuelven «clichés», y perdón por la reiteración.)

Los tranvías de una calle de Praga: podemos oír todo el ruido que les circunda en esa fotografía de Sudek de 1924. Su húmeda ventana, que da a la calle, respira su humedad.

Al atreverme a escribir este texto sobre un maestro, intento decir lo que pienso. Sin embargo, creo que todos los fotógrafos estarán de acuerdo: Josef Sudek es la fotografía.

Y a nosotros la admiración nos deja boquiabiertos, ¿verdad?

Josef Sudek

Madrid - Prague

Josef Sudek
We have found this beautiful text by Antonio Muñoz Molina in the last edition of Babelia only some hours after we have illustrated with a quotation from his Sefarad the importance of the celebrations of the Holy Week in Úbeda. The text, which perhaps intentionally imitates the “long sentences” of Bohumil Hrabal, speaks about Josef Sudek, whose photos have been recently exhibited for the first time after half century in Madrid. The life and figure of Sudek are just as enigmatic as the city he kept photographing in all his life, and his images have directly or indirectly determined the way we look at Prague.

Josef Sudek
Josef Sudek is a man roaming the streets of Prague, bent under the weight of a cumbersome and archaic camera and of a tripod of an itinerant photographer, a photographer left here from a previous epoch who takes his pictures hidden under the large black veil and slowly pressing the rubber ball of the releasing mechanism. In a Zen koan they ask how the clap of one hand sounds. The art of Josef Sudek has something of the fabulous resonance of this hand which cannot clap with the other, as he had lost his right arm on the Italian front during the First World War, and although sometimes an assistant helps him to stand up the camera, during his taciturn roamings over Prague he is always seen alone, the clumsy Kodak of 1894 and the tripod already became a part of his profile, just like the beret and the black coat and the left shoulder sinking always lower in lack of the counterweight of the right arm, already a phantasm and still painful, amputated in the field hospital. In 1926, when Josef Sudek had been a war invalid for almost ten years, he once again returned to Italy accompanying his friends from the Prague Philharmonics. Music was his other great love. In the middle of a concert he rose from his seat, left the theater like a somnambulant, and through deserted and dark streets he reached the outskirts of the town, wandering all through the night, this time free from the weight of the camera, lost in unknown landscapes. And in the gray fog of the dawn in a plain field he saw a farmhouse, and with the inappellable certainty of the dreams he knew that this was the farmhouse where he had been taken when he was wounded, when his arm was cut off. “But I have not found my arm,” he related later, although he did not tell where he had been after, while his friends from the orchestra were looking in vain for him before continuing the tour without him.

Josef Sudek
He returned from this journey and did not leave Prague any more. He rented a small studio looking onto a shady garden and there he worked and lived during the fifty years that were left to him. The war and the loss of the right arm swept his youth off. The obstacles on my way became my way, writes Nietzsche. It is possible that the real vocation is a way which opens by chance after all the other ones which looked more evident are closed. If they did not have to amputate his right arm at the height of the shulder because of a necrotized wound, Josef Sudek would have become a bookbinder. And without the small disability pension he received after the war he could have not devoted himself to photography
, body and soul. He began by taking pictures of the veterans he met by chance in the hospitals, of those mutilated and spiritually distorted figures populating all Europe after the slaughter, but it took him years to find his own style. At the age of twenty he had to learn how to live with one arm less, how to manage the camera and the process of image development. But it was even more difficult to learn how to see those things that nobody paid attention to, although they were there before the eyes of everyone. To do so, he had to center himself, to choose or find a fix position in the chaos and multiplicity of the world, like sharpening the focus of a lens. In order to see Prague, Josef Sudek had to leave Prague for a while. He traveled to the south, and in that Italian dawn – with the fertile plains and hazy distances only interrupted by some houses or trees – he saw the same place again where his previous life had been broken by the machine-gun, and although he could not find his missing arm any more, but nevertheless he found his other, invisible arm and hand with which he could give form to the mystery of his poetic invention.

Josef Sudek
He did not need to leave any more. The farthest terra incognita he rambled to were the fields over the tramway terminuses. He strolled about the streets with the large camera on his shoulder, in a hurry to arrive to a certain constellation of the lights, or remaining still for several minutes waiting for the right moment under the black veil. He used to say that photographing is a strange art, as it cannot show the things openly, only through allusions, revealing only the necessary minimum in order the complete image be born in the look and in the imagination of the onlooker. The panoramic format of 30×10 permitted by his camera embraced the horizontality of a square or of a field in which the human silhouettes appear isolated in the distance, but are not lost in it, for sometimes they seem to be absorbed in contemplation like the background figures of a painting by Friedrich, and sometimes we see them walking with a determined purpose, men and women crossing a street in the downtown, or moving off towards a housing block after having got off from the tramway at the last station, which is already not in the city and not yet in the fields but somewhere on the outskirts from where the roofs and towers of Prague seem just slightly more than a jagged profile on the horizon.

Josef Sudek
Gallery + + + + +
Catálogo 2009
Film + +
Sudek + + + + + + +
Wikipedia (Czech)
Blog + + + + + + +
Sudek Studio
Books +
In the photos of Sudek Prague seems to be suspended in time, offuscated in the ambiguous lights of the sunsets and dawns, depopulated and silent in the humid winter nights ligthed by the phosphorescence of the fog or of the snow and traversed by tramways like by submarines with reflectors on their prow. This is that assaulted and tormented city where the refugees of half Europe sought shelter from the advancement of Nazism, the one retaining its breath when in the infamous pact of Munich of
November 1938 the British and French permitted to Hitler to amputate half of the country, the one occupied in 1939 by the German army and by the efficient executioners of the Gestapo, the one which, only a few years after the end of the Nazi occupation, succumbed to the puppet regime of the Communists manipulated by the Soviets. Prague, which used to be in the heart of Europe, retired far behind the hermetism of the Iron Curtain: this is how we see her in these photos of Sudek from the fifties that are now exhibited in Madrid, in a silent room of the Círculo de Bellas Artes. A city of squares without traffic and of deserted nights in which the shudder of the military tattoo is still resounding, of statues full of pathos on the façades of the buildings, of windows covered with moisture, of shady gardens beaten up by the weeds that exhale the deep odour of humid earth and wet leaves. In the silence some steps resound on the cobblestones, the rumor of panting breath. The man of the sloping shoulder is sleeplessly roaming the city, in search of that light of the dawn which he only saw twice in his life, on the day when his arm was amputated, and on the day when, many years later, by wandering as in a dream, he found it.

Josef Sudek

Madrid - Praga

Josef Sudek
Hallamos este hermoso escrito de Antonio Muñoz Molina en la última edición de Babelia sólo unas horas después de que ilustráramos con una cita de su Sefarad la importancia de las celebraciones de la Semana Santa en Úbeda. El texto, que quizá intencionadamente imita las «sentencias largas» de Bohumil Hrabal, habla sobre Josef Sudek, cuyas fotos se han expuesto en Madrid por primera vez después de medio siglo. La historia y figura de Sudek son tan enigmáticas como la ciudad que él fotografió durante toda su vida y sus imágenes, directa o indirectamente, han determinado hasta hoy nuestra manera de ver Praga.

Josef Sudek
Josef Sudek es un hombre que camina por las calles de Praga encorvado por el peso de una cámara voluminosa y arcaica y de un trípode de fotógrafo ambulante, de fotógrafo siempre como de otra época que se oculta bajo la joroba de la cortinilla negra para tomar sus retratos, apretando despacio la pera de goma del disparador. En un acertijo Zen la pregunta es cómo sonará la palmada de una sola mano. El arte de Josef Sudek tiene algo de la resonancia quimérica de esa mano que no puede chocar con otra, porque había perdido el brazo derecho en el frente italiano durante la Primera Guerra Mundial, y aunque a veces un asistente le ayudaba a preparar la cámara, en sus caminatas callejeras solía vérsele por Praga cargando con ella a solas, el armatoste Kodak de 1894 y el trípode convertidos ya en una parte de su perfil, como la boina y la capa negra y el hombro izquierdo cada vez más inclinado, a falta del contrapeso del otro brazo ya fantasma, dolorido todavía, amputado en un hospital de la retaguardia. En 1926, cuando Josef Sudek llevaba casi diez años siendo un mutilado de guerra, volvió a Italia acompañando a sus amigos de la Filarmónica de Praga. La música era su otro gran amor. En medio de un concierto se levantó de su asiento y salió como sonámbulo del teatro, y por calles vacías y a oscuras llegó al extrarradio y estuvo caminando toda la noche, esta vez más ligero sin el peso de la cámara, perdido en paisajes que no conocía. En la niebla gris del amanecer, en un campo llano, vio una granja, con la sensación de reconocimiento inapelable de los sueños. Era la granja a la que lo habían llevado cuando fue herido, cuando le cortaron el brazo. «Pero mi brazo no lo encontré», contaba luego, aunque no dijo dónde estuvo después, cuando sus amigos de la orquesta lo buscaron en vano antes de continuar sin él la gira.

Josef Sudek
Volvió de ese viaje y ya nunca más salió de Praga. Alquiló un pequeño taller que daba a un jardín umbrío y en él trabajó y vivió los cincuenta años que le quedaban de vida. La guerra y la pérdida del brazo habían trastornado su juventud. Los obstáculos en mi camino se convirtieron en mi camino, escribe Nietzsche. La verdadera vocación puede ser un camino que sólo se abre por azar cuando se han cerrado otros que parecían más evidentes. Si no hubieran tenido que amputarle el brazo derecho a la altura del hombro por culpa de una herida de guerra infectada Josef Sudek habría sido encuadernador. Y sin la pequeña pensión de invalidez que le quedó después de la guerra no habría podido dedicarse en cuerpo y alma a la fotografía. Empezó haciendo retratos de los veteranos con los que coincidía en los hospitales, figuras de aquella población de espectros mutilados o enloquecidos que quedó en Europa después de la carnicería, pero iba a tardar algunos años en encontrar su estilo. Con veintitantos años tenía que aprender a vivir con un brazo de menos, a manejar la cámara y los procesos del revelado. Pero más difícil era aprender a mirar aquellas cosas en las que nadie reparaba aunque estuvieran a la vista de todos. Para hacer algo era preciso centrarse: elegir o encontrar una posición fija en el aturdimiento y la variedad del mundo; como ajustar el foco de una lente. Para mirar Praga, Josef Sudek tuvo que irse brevemente de Praga. Viajó hacia el sur y en aquel amanecer italiano —las llanuras fértiles, las distancias brumosas, interrumpidas por casas o árboles— vio de nuevo el lugar en el que su primera vida había sido destrozada por la metralla, y al no encontrar el brazo que le faltaba lo que descubrió fue el otro brazo y la otra mano invisibles gracias a los cuales iba a resonar el misterio de su invención poética.

Josef Sudek
Ya no necesitaría salir nunca más. La tierra incógnita más alejada en la que iba a aventurarse eran los descampados al final de las líneas de los tranvías. Trotaba por los callejones con la gran joroba de la cámara al hombro, dándose prisa para llegar a un cierto instante de luz, o se quedaba inmóvil durante muchos minutos, esperando el momento exacto, cobijado por la cortinilla negra. Decía que fotografiar era un arte raro, porque no se podían mostrar las cosas abiertamente, sino dando pistas, desvelando sólo lo justo, para que la imagen completa estuviera en la mirada y en la imaginación del espectador. Los formatos panorámicos de 30×10 que permitía su cámara abarcaban la horizontalidad de una plaza o de una llanura en las que las siluetas humanas están aisladas en la lejanía, pero no perdidas en ella, porque unas veces tienen el aire de contemplación de las figuras de espaldas en los cuadros de Friedrich y otras se las ve caminar con un propósito ensimismado, hombres y mujeres que cruzan una calle céntrica o que se alejan hacia un bloque de viviendas después de bajarse del tranvía en la última parada, la que ya no está en la ciudad pero tampoco es el campo, el extrarradio desde el que los tejados y las torres de Praga son poco más que un perfil recortado contra el horizonte.

Josef Sudek
Galeria + + + + +
Catálogo 2009
Película + +
Sudek + + + + + + +
Wikipedia (checo)
Blog + + + + + + +
Sudek Studio
Libros +
En las fotos de Sudek Praga parece suspendida en el tiempo, desdibujada en las luces ambiguas de los atardeceres y los amaneceres, deshabitada y silenciosa en noches húmedas de invierno, en noches con la fosforescencia de la niebla o la nieve atravesadas por tranvías como submarinos con un faro encendido en la proa. Pero ésa es la ciudad asediada y convulsa a la que acuden refugiados de media Europa según avanza el nazismo, la que contiene el aliento cuando en noviembre de 1938, en el pacto infame de Múnich, los británicos y franceses aceptan que la mitad del país sea amputada para entregársela a Hitler, la que en 1939 es ocupada por el ejército alemán y por los eficaces carniceros de la Gestapo, la que sólo unos pocos años después del final de la ocupación nazi sucumbe a la mascarada de un régimen comunista mangoneado por los soviéticos. La Praga que estuvo en el corazón de Europa se volvía remota tras el hermetismo del Telón de Acero: así la vemos en estas fotos de Sudek de los años cincuenta que se muestran ahora en Madrid, en una sala recóndita del Círculo de Bellas Artes. Una ciudad de plazas sin tráfico y noches deshabitadas en las que todavía perdura el escalofrío del toque de queda, de estatuas enfáticas en las cornisas de los edificios, de cristales de ventanas empañados por la condensación, de jardines en sombras comidos por la maleza que exhalan un olor profundo a tierra húmeda y hojas empapadas. En el silencio unos pasos suenan sobre los adoquines, una respiración jadeante. El hombre insomne de la espalda torcida camina por la ciudad en busca de aquella luz de amanecer que vio sólo dos veces en su vida, el día en que le amputaron el brazo, el día en que lo buscó varios años después como extraviado en un sueño.


Josef Sudek

The cats of Buenos Aires - The Botánico

I’m sure that two ideas come to mind to every porteño – the inhabitants of Buenos Aires – who is asked about “the cats of Buenos Aires” as I was by Tamás a propos of the cats of the Tower of the Souls.

In the first place, even though understanding that one was of course asked about the quadruped mammals of the feline species, one has to make an effort to leave aside the vulgar meaning of “gato” in lunfardo, the argot of Buenos Aires, and therefore forget the young ladies of an ancient profession or those who, even though amateurs, assume a quite peculiar aesthetic and do not hide a marked interest in the economic capacity of their possible conquests (whoever should need further explanations, refer to Puto el que lee. Diccionario argentino de insultos, injurias e improperios [He’s a faggot who reads it. Argentine dictionary of insults, affronts and verbal abuses], Editor. Gente Grossa, Buenos Aires, 2006, s.v. ‘gato’.)

Secondly, and now without second meanings in his head, the porteño who is asked about the cats of his city will indefectibly think about one place: the Botánico.

Buenos Aires, Jardín Botánico
The Botanical Garden of Buenos Aires, inaugurated in 1898, occupying six or seven blocks in the district of Palermo, was designed by the great French landscape architect Charles Thays, designer of the majority of Buenos Aires’ most characteristic squares and parks. It has had better and worse times, receiving more or less maintenance, but for me, it always keeps its charm.

This affection is special, moreover, because up to my seventh year I lived just three blocks away from the Botánico and I cannot avoid associating that part of the neighbourhood of Palermo with the years when I was small (and an only child!). The walks in the Botánico were daily: before taking me to my kindergarten, my mother took me almost ever day to the playground just outside it. (The anecdotes about my first feints in social relationships, so many times recalled by the family, I prefer to leave under a charitable mantle of silence… let each one imagine what he wishes.)

All these personal digressions, only to explain the pleasure with which I undertook the photographic mission which arose from Tamás’ question: “how are you concerning cats in Buenos Aires?”

It was a grey day in the beginning of Autumn and a very special one for the whole country because we were bidding farewell to the remains of Raúl Alfonsín, our first President after the return of Democracy in 1983. After participating in the multitudinous farewell, we took our daughters on a photographical safari to the place where I played and strolled during my childhood.

But let’s talk about the protagonists. I don’t know when the Botánico became the reservoir of cats that it has been ever since I can remember. There have been periods of discussions about it and also attempts of murderous razzias, but those times are over. I have just found out that there is a Voluntary Association who looks after them. I hope it’s still active because its Web page has not been brought up to date for some time (apart from having appalling spelling mistakes.) The fact is that nowadays the cats in the Botánico look clean and vivid. But of course, they’re desperate for a little affection, or maybe that is what they make you think, when in fact they approach you in search of food… But it’s the same thing. Because for cats, and more so for stray ones, food and love go hand in hand.

Buenos Aires, Jardín Botánico
At the Santa Fe Street Entrance, a sign appeals to the compassion of owners who abandon their cats here. “Don’t abandon your pets. They need: shelter, food, vaccines and, above all, love and care.”

Buenos Aires, Jardín Botánico
This lovely grey cat helps, with his melancholy attitude, to show us the pathetic situation of many abandoned pets…

Buenos Aires, Jardín Botánico
However, most of the Botánico cats were born here and would have difficulty in adapting themselves to the more comfortable confinement of an apartment, away from their fellows, from the countless trees, hiding places and perfumes that they can enjoy here.

Buenos Aires, Jardín Botánico
It’s also curious to realize that many of the visitors in the Botánico wander through its paths searching not only for the solace of vegetation in the midst of the city but also, as we did on that second of April, in pursuit of the cats, photographing them, fondling them and choosing their favorites.

Buenos Aires, Jardín BotánicoThis is mine.

So, to answer at last Tamás’ question, I think that we are doing very well concerning cats in Buenos Aires. We, cat addicts or philofelines or however you would like to name those of us who enjoy, love and admire cats, are many.

To conclude, a wise reflection by one of the latest and best cats in Argentine comic strips: Fellini, created by the brilliant Liniers.

Felini, the cat in the LiniersI don’t know why you only look to one direction.
There are so many.

Los gatos de Buenos Aires - El Botánico

Podría asegurar que dos ideas vienen a la mente de cualquier porteño a quien se le pregunte por «los gatos de Buenos Aires», como hizo Tamás conmigo a propósito de los gatos de la Torre de ses Ànimes.

En primer lugar, aunque reconozca que efectivamente le preguntaban por los mamíferos cuadrúpedos de la especie de los felinos, tendrá que hacer un esfuerzo por dejar de lado el sentido vulgar de «gato» en lunfardo (nuestra jerga) y olvidar entonces a señoritas de profesión antigua o a aquellas que, aún siendo amateurs, adoptan una estética muy particular y no ocultan su marcado interés por la capacidad económica de sus posibles conquistas (quien necesite aclaraciones, diríjase a Puto el que lee. Diccionario argentino de insultos, injurias e improperios, Ed. Gente Grossa, Buenos Aires, 2006, s.v. ‘gato’).

En segundo lugar, y ya sin dobles sentidos en la cabeza, el porteño al que le pregunten por los gatos de su ciudad, pensará indefectiblemente en un lugar: el Botánico.

Buenos Aires, Jardín Botánico
El Jardín Botánico de Buenos Aires, inaugurado en 1898, ocupa unas 6 o 7 manzanas del barrio de Palermo y fue diseñado por el gran paisajista francés Carlos Thays, responsable de la mayoría de las plazas y parques más característicos de Buenos Aires. Ha tenido tiempos mejores y peores, con más o menos cuidado, pero para mí siempre mantiene su encanto.

El cariño es especial, además, porque hasta los 7 años viví a tres cuadras del Botánico. Así que no puedo dejar de asociar esa parte del barrio de Palermo con los años en que era chica (¡e hija única!). Los paseos por el Botánico eran cotidianos; antes de dejarme en el jardín de infantes, mi madre me llevaba casi todos los días a jugar en la plaza con juegos que tiene en uno de sus laterales. (Las anécdotas sobre mis primeras artes en las relaciones sociales, tantas veces recordadas por la familia, prefería dejarlas bajo un manto de piadoso silencio… que cada uno imagine lo que quiera.)

Toda esta digresión personal, para dar a entender el gusto de emprender la misión fotográfica que despertó la pregunta de Tamás por «cómo andan de gatos en Buenos Aires».

Fue un día gris de comienzo del otoño y muy especial para todo el país porque despedíamos los restos de Raúl Alfonsín, el primer presidente luego de la vuelta de la democracia en 1983. Luego de participar de la despedida multitudinaria, llevamos a mis hijas de safari fotográfico por el lugar de paseos y juegos de mi infancia.

Pero hablemos de los protagonistas. No sé en qué momento el Jardín Botánico se convirtió en el reservorio de gatos que es desde que tengo memoria. Hubo tiempos de discusiones e intentos de razias asesinas, pero esos tiempos han pasado. Acabo de descubrir que hay una asociación civil que se ocupa de ellos, espero que siga activa porque la página no se actualiza desde hace tiempo (y tiene unos errores ortográficos tremebundos…). Lo cierto es que hoy en día a los gatos del Botánico se los ve limpios y lozanos. Eso sí desesperados por un poco de cariño, o quizás eso nos hacen creer cuando en realidad se nos acercan esperando comida… Pero es lo mismo, para los gatos, y más aún para los callejeros, comida y cariño van de la mano.

Buenos Aires, Jardín Botánico
En la entrada por la Avenida Santa Fe, un cartel apela a la compasión de los dueños que abandonan aquí sus gatos. «No abandone sus mascotas. Ellos necesitan: abrigo, alimento, vacunas y por sobre todo, cariño y cuidados.»

Buenos Aires, Jardín Botánico
Este precioso gato gris ayuda con su gesto melancólico a mostrarnos el patetismo de la situación de muchas mascotas abandonadas…

Buenos Aires, Jardín Botánico
Sin embargo la mayoría de los gatos del Botánico, nacieron aquí y difícilmente se adaptarían al encierro del más cómodo de los departamentos. Alejados de sus congéneres, de los innumerables árboles, escondites y perfumes de los que aquí pueden disfrutar.

Buenos Aires, Jardín Botánico
También es curioso darse cuenta de que muchos de los visitantes del Botánico recorren sus senderos no sólo buscando el solaz de la vegetación en medio de la ciudad, sino que como hicimos nosotros ese 2 de abril, andan detrás de los gatos, los fotografían, acarician y eligen a sus preferidos.

Buenos Aires, Jardín BotánicoEste es el mío.

Así que para responder finalmente a la pregunta de Tamás, creo que andamos bien de gatos en Buenos Aires; somos muchos los gatoadictos, filofelinos o como se quiera llamar a quienes disfrutamos, queremos y admiramos a los gatos.

Para terminar, una sabia reflexión de uno de los últimos y mejores gatos de la historieta argentina: Felini, creado por el genial Liniers.

Felini, the cat in the Liniers

El ruiseñor canta de nuevo

Nightingale
Nuestro amigo Két Sheng nos ha mostrado en los días pasados el hermoso camino que lleva desde una canción tradicional húngara, El gallo está cantando, hasta la canción sefardí Los bilbilicos cantan, a través de la bendición judía Tzur mi-shelo. Allí recordaba Két Sheng que, aparte del gallo, también el ruiseñor aparece como heraldo del amanecer y símbolo de las expectativas de la llegada del Mesías salvador en la tradición hebraica. «No podemos cerrar con más belleza el círculo de nuestro recorrido que exponiendo esta intrincada red de relaciones entre la canción hasídica húngara, la canción amorosa sefardí y el piadoso poema litúrgico judío», escribía al final de su ensayo.

Museo Meermanno Bestiary: NightingalePero el círculo no está cerrado del todo. El ruiseñor como símbolo del alma que anhela al Salvador es algo bien conocido en la tradición cristiana medieval. Y su desarrollo tiene una historia tan larga y trabada que hace muy posible que la canción sefardí extrajera de ahí el motivo. Sigue siendo muy útil visitar, al respecto, aquel artículo de Mª Rosa Lida de Malkiel —que, por cierto, era judía— «El ruiseñor de las Geórgicas y su influencia en la lírica española de la Edad de Oro» (en La tradición clásica en España, Barcelona, 1975).

Los bestiarios medievales aún no reflejan este sentido alegórico. Como leemos en la página sobre el «ruiseñor» del magnífico Bestiario Medieval, solo se registran tres rasgos del ave. Plinio les da la información de que los ruiseñores empiezan a cantar en la primavera, cuando reverdecen los árboles (la calandria y el ruiseñor dialogan en el famoso romance castellano del ballestero «cuando los trigos encañan / y están los campos en flor»). Empieza entonces una verdadera competición de canto donde los perdedores pagarán con su vida el esfuerzo. San Isidoro de Sevilla en sus tan geniales como fantasiosas etimologías, hace derivar a la luscinia de lucis (luz), porque Aberdeen Bestiary: Nightingalees ave que nos trae la luz de la mañana con su canto. Y por fin —aunque el Bestiario Medieval no menciona su fuente— San Ambrosio acuña la difundida parábola que compara al ruiseñor empollando los huevos y manteniéndose despierto con su propio canto, con la pobre viuda que cuida a sus hijos día y noche.

El misticismo franciscano del siglo XIII dio un nuevo giro a la interpretación alegórica del ruiseñor. Aquella nueva religiosidad, que contrastaba con el cristianismo más racionalista anterior, enfatizaba la relación personal con Dios, promoviendo las emociones, la interiorización del sufrimiento de Cristo. Y encontró en el ruiseñor un inesperado aliado. Dulcius in solitis cantat philomela rubetis, en la soledad del bosque canta más dulce el ruiseñor, escribió el rudimentario Maximianus Etruscus, convirtiendo este verso en el lema de la nueva religiosidad introspectiva y al ruiseñor en el símbolo del alma que clama por el Salvador.

El misticismo del ruiseñor, que a lo largo del siglo XIII se iría enriqueciendo con varios motivos y que, a la vez, modularía numerosos versos de la poesía amorosa cortesana (apareciendo, incluso, en los goliardescos Carmina Burana), fue resumido por el arzobispo franciscano de Canterbury John Peckham en su elegante poema latino Philomena. Este poema se atribuyó a San Buenaventura y así se divulgó e influyó en toda Europa (fray Luis de Granada, por ejemplo, hizo una delicada traducción en prosa). En sus versos, el ruiseñor —presentado con las fórmulas típicas de la lírica trovadoresca provenzal— es símbolo del monje que canta sin cesar, igual que el ruiseñor de Ambrosio, y que practica la «meditación por la imagen» que desarrollaron los franciscanos y luego impulsarán los jesuitas: desde el crepúsculo hasta la salida del sol canta sobre Adán y los sufrimientos de la raza humana irredenta; desde el alba, sobre los acontecimientos de la vida de Cristo; desde las tres, sobre las escenas de la pasión y muerte, hasta que él mismo muere de pena y agotamiento a la caída del sol. Justo como el ruiseñor de Plinio.

John Peckham, PhilomenaManuscrito de hacia 1330 de la Philomena de John Peckham conservado en la Glasgow
Library.
En la inicial inferior “P(hilomena)” el ruiseñor y el monje meditan sobre las
escenas de la vida de Cristo representadas en la inicial superior “C(hristus)”:
su nacimiento e infancia, sus enseñanzas, María Magdalena lavando
su pies, sus sufrimientos y muerte en la cruz.

Este poema de Peckham / Buenaventura fue conocido por San Juan de la Cruz —puede que en la traducción en verso de Juan López de Úbeda—. Y San Juan elige todo el material simbólico del canto del ruiseñor para descargarlo justamente en el clímax final de su Cántico espiritual (luego solo queda la última estrofa donde se cierra el poema en un cierto anticlímax). El canto en que se agotaba el ruiseñor es ahora, por el contrario, en la sintética lira de San Juan, equivalente a una «llama que consume y no da pena». Todo está ahí: el cese de los anhelos, la «soledad sonora» de los primeros versos del poema que se hace aún más dulce en «el soto y su donaire» —un soto que ya no se transita «con presura»—, el musical anuncio de la salvación inminente y definitiva, la llegada a una realidad superior y luminosa, la entrega y el descanso final en una noche que es, a la vez, un nuevo y encendido día.
El aspirar del ayre,
el canto de la dulce filomena,
el soto y su donayre
en la noche serena,
con llama que consume y no da pena.

Pero ¿dónde ha quedado en nuestro recorrido anterior la tercera característica, la del ruiseñor como portador de la luz? La alegoría medieval no se había olvidado tampoco de ella. Plinio hablaba de la canción del ruiseñor entre los árboles que reverdecen. Y en la Edad Media despunta la idea de que el ruiseñor empieza a cantar en la noche de Pascua como un anuncio de la inminente resurrección de Cristo. Así se escribe en el Carmen Paschale, el Poema Pascual, de Sedulius Schottus. Y, de hecho, la canción del ruiseñor aún resuena en la liturgia nocturna del Sábado Santo, en la secuencia del Salve festa dies de Venantius Fortunatus, donde el Resucitado trae la luz al mundo que revive y retoña.

Y aquí llegamos a la fiesta de hoy. Deseamos un muy feliz día de Pascua a todos nuestros lectores.


Canto del ruiseñor (3'15"), extraído de aquí. Otra versión se encuentra aquí (buscar „fülemüle”).